VOC Step 1: Preparation by the teacher

It is advised that you read all the steps and watch some completed videos before starting your own vidumath project. You can see a playlist of over 80 videos here. It is also important to understand that although the mathematics in the project is preeminent, the motivation for the children is making their own video. The learning happens because the students have to spend time thinking about the mathematics they want to present and viewing it from alternative perspectives from the regular classroom. Most importantly, children need first to understand deeply the mathematical concepts in order to make the video correctly.

Before starting the project

Decide what mathematics subject you will use in your video.  In the PDF document ‘vidumath example Maths problems‘ you will find some problems the project has already used with children. There are different possibilities when to use video in the learning process. Experience has shown that it should be an area that the students find quite difficult.

There are a range of video techniques: one shot video, stop-motion or creative explorations. Initially he choice should depend on your experience. The guides on the different types of video and how to use them are found in the Video technical support page and subsequent pages. We provide EasyIntermediary and Advanced tasks.

You need about 15 minutes planning including making a storyboard. Filming, depending on technique will take 10 to 45 minutes. Editing (post-production) takes a maximum of 30 minutes.

Materials you use can include both normal class project materials and resources for mathematical visualisation: coloured paper, coloured markers and pencils, paper clips, adhesives, scissors, rulers, beads, Dienes’ blocks, Math Link Cubes, play dough etc. Sweets such as chocolate beans, jelly beans, gummi bears are very useful, and can be eaten after. Some projects require objects from everyday life, such as plates, cups, forks, etc.

In a student project

Follow the path:

  • Understand the project: read guides, watch videos
  • Decide on a mathematics topic
  • Decide which video technique to use
  • Form groups taking the class dynamics on board
  • Set project timetable

A group size of two to four worked best in our try-outs. Experience has shown that groups work best when students have the same level of mathematics competence and enthusiasm for the work.

In our experience planning takes about 45 minutes. More time for the planning is needed if the students have to solve a mathematical problem. That depends on how difficult the problem is. Little planning is needed if the children have got a discovery task. Filming takes between 30 and 120 minutes. A one-shot video is produced very quickly, stop-motion and creative explorations take more time.

Post-production takes about 30 minutes. How much time is needed for reflection depends on how many videos there are and how complex the mathematics is.

Ensure that materials are available – both normal class project materials and resources for mathematical visualisation: coloured paper, coloured markers and pencils, paper clips, adhesives, scissors, rulers, beads, Dienes’ blocks, Math Link Cubes, play dough etc. If it is permitted in your school, it is very motivating for the children to use sweets, e.g. chocolate beans, jelly beans, gummi bears. Some projects require objects from everyday life, such as plates, cups, forks.

Step 2: Introducing the project to students